September 16, 2014

Chesapeake Energy’s $5 Billion Shuffle

The energy giant raised the cash it needed to survive by slashing royalties it paid property owners to drill on their land
By Abrahm Lustgarten, ProPublica, March 13, 2014

At the end of 2011, Chesapeake Energy, one of the nation’s biggest oil and gas companies, was teetering on the brink … Continue reading

Frackers Avoid Paying Royalties

Unfair Share: How Oil and Gas Drillers Avoid Paying Royalties
by Abrahm Lustgarten
ProPublica, Aug. 13, 2013, 10:20 a.m.

Don Feusner ran dairy cattle on his 370-acre slice of northern Pennsylvania until he could no longer turn a profit by farming. Then, at age 60, he sold all but a … Continue reading

How the Feds Let Industry Pollute the Nation’s Underground Water Supply

Part of an Ongoing Investigation
By Abrahm Lustgarten, ProPublica, Dec. 11, 2012

Federal officials have given energy and mining companies permission to pollute aquifers in more than 1,500 places across the country, releasing toxic material into underground reservoirs that help supply more than half of the nation’s drinking water.

In

Continue reading

Injection Wells: The Hidden Risks of Pumping Waste Underground

A Series of Articles on the Hazards of Injection Wells
By Abrahm Lustgarten, ProPublica

Injection wells used to dispose of the nation’s most toxic waste are showing increasing signs of stress as regulatory oversight falls short and scientific assumptions prove flawed.

ProPublica reporter Abrahm Lustgarten has launched a new and … Continue reading

So, Is Dimock’s Water Really Safe to Drink?

Dimock water found to contain dangerous quantities of methane gas and dozens of other contaminants.
by Abrahm Lustgarten, ProPublica, March 20, 2012

When the Environmental Protection Agency announced last week that tests showed the water is safe to drink in Dimock, Penn., a national hot spot for concerns about fracking, … Continue reading

Charting the Government’s Moves on Fracking

From Gung-Ho to Uh-Oh: Charting the Government’s Moves on Fracking

by Lena Groeger, ProPublica, February 7, 2012

Fracking has only recently become a household word, but government involvement with the drilling technique goes back decades. President Obama has championed the potential of natural gas drilling combined with more regulationContinue reading

Feds link water contamination to fracking for the first time

Abrahm Lustgarten and Nicholas Kusnetz, ProPublica

In a first, federal environment officials today scientifically linked underground water pollution with hydraulic fracturing, concluding that contaminants found in central Wyoming were likely caused by the gas drilling process.

The findings by the Environmental Protection Agency come partway through a separate national study … Continue reading

Expert Reports Challenge DRBC on Wells Drilled Within Watershed

Delaware RiverKeeper Network (DRN), and Damascus Citizens for Sustainability (DCS) were co-appellants in a Consolidated Administrative Hearing before a Delaware River Basin Commission [DRBC] Judge.

The following reports were submitted in this hearing and their sworn testimony will forever change the debate. These report have established a record for all … Continue reading

EPA Finds Compound Used in Fracking in Wyoming Aquifer

Abrahm Lustgarten, Propublica

As the country awaits results from a nationwide safety study on the natural gas drilling process of fracking, a separate government investigation into contamination in a place where residents have long complained that drilling fouled their water has turned up alarming levels of underground pollution.

A pair … Continue reading

Duke University: Scientific Proof Drilling/Fracking Contaminates Water

ProPublica, ABRAHM LUSTGARTEN

Scientific Study Links Flammable Drinking Water to Fracking

http://www.propublica.org/article/scientific-study-links-flammable-drinking-water-to-fracking

For the first time, a peer-reviewed scientific study has linked gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing with a pattern of drinking water contamination so severe that some faucets can be lit on fire. Publication in the Proceedings of the … Continue reading